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Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium
 

What is the Pupil Premium?  The National Picture
The Pupil Premium was introduced by the Government in April 2011.  It was designed to give additional money to support schools in raising the attainment of children who are eligible for free school meals and those children in local authority care. These groups of children have been identified nationally as achieving at a lower level than children from less disadvantaged backgrounds.  For example, national figures show that 11 year olds who are eligible for Free School Meals are around twice as likely not to achieve age related expectations in maths and English as other 11 year olds. 
 
It is described as follows: “the pupil premium is additional funding given to publicly funded schools in England to raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers”.
 
Where does the money come from? 
Pupil Premium is allocated to schools based on the number of children who are currently known to be eligible for Free School Meals, and those who have been in receipt of Free School Meals at any time during the past six years. Also included are children who have been looked after in local authority care continuously for more than six months.
 
Nationally, the level of the Pupil Premium in 2014-15 was £1300 per pupil. It increased slightly to £1320 per pupil in 2015-16.  A lower premium is also in place for children whose parents are currently serving in the Armed Forces. The level of Pupil Premium for the financial year 2017-2018 is as follows: 

  • £1320 per pupil who has been eligible for free school meals in any of the previous six years
  • £1900 per looked after child
  • £1900 per child adopted from care under the Adoption and Children Act 2002
  • £300 per pupil whose parents have served in the armed forces within the last four years

 

For the pupils who attract the £1,900 rate, the virtual school head of the local authority that looks after the pupil will manage the funding.


The purpose of the Pupil Premium is to help schools to provide targeted support for vulnerable children- not necessarily just children who qualify for FSM.
 
“It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium, allocated to schools per FSM pupil, is spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility.” Source - DfE website 
 
The funding is therefore given to schools to spend as they think best, although there is a requirement to publish online how this money is spent and the impact.
 
For the financial year 2017/18, Sun Hill Junior School received £39,973 Pupil Premium funding.

Pupil Premium Strategy

The following seven ‘building blocks’ form the strategy to improve outcomes for our disadvantaged pupils:

  • Whole-school ethos of attainment for all

    There is an expectation that all pupils should achieve high levels of attainment. There is an ethos that all disadvantaged pupils are capable of overcoming their personal barriers to succeed.

  • Addressing behaviour and attendance

    The school responds rapidly to ensure behaviour management strategies are effective for pupils that need support. Attendance is monitored. Strategies, where applicable, are implemented to improve absence or lateness to maximise opportunities for learning in school.

  • High quality teaching for all

    The school places a strong emphasis on ensuring all disadvantaged pupils receive high quality teaching; responsive on- going formative assessment is essential to ensure disadvantaged pupils make strong progress.

  • Meeting individual learning needs

    Personalised profiles are used to ensure barriers are overcome so that disadvantaged pupils can benefit from enrichment, emotional well -being support and interventions that enable them to succeed in their learning across a wide range of subjects.

  • Deploying staff effectively

    Both teachers and support staff are deployed flexibly in response to the changing learning needs of disadvantaged pupils.

  • Data-driven and responding to evidence

    The progress of disadvantaged pupils is discussed at all pupil progress meetings and at key assessment milestones.  Actions are identified, implemented and regularly reviewed within each assessment phase.

  • Clear, responsive leadership

    The inclusion leader leads a strategy group comprising of the Head Teacher, Assessment Leader, SENCo, ELSA and a governor. English and Mathematic Leaders are involved in monitoring activities designed to secure good progress.

 

Pupil Premium Context Information

Our current Pupil Premium group profile is as follows (September 2016).

 

 

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Whole school numbers and %

 

TOTAL

 

4

3

 

3

 

7

17

(8%)

GIRLS

 

2

2 1 4

9

(4%)

BOYS

 

2

1 2 3

8

(3.6%)

FSM

 

4

3 1 3

11

(5%)

EVER 6

 

1

0 3 3

7

(3.2%)

SERVICE

 

0

0

0

1

1

(0.4%)

LAC

 

0

0 0 0

0

(0%)

POST LAC

0

0

0

1

1

(0.4%)

SEN

 

2

1

1

0

4

(1.8%)

 
 

 

Pupil Premium Provision and Interventions

 

It is imperative to understand that every child is different; different needs and different strengths and our Pupil Premium category is no different. The way in which we have spent the grant reflects this to utilise it in the best possible way. There are direct approaches to ‘narrow the gap’ and more creative approaches to support and enhance the social and emotional well-being which has an impact on their self-belief and self-esteem. Although the Pupil Premium has been used to directly impact on individuals, it has also had an effect on whole school as all children have been and are benefitting from whole school changes that have taken place to improve learning for all. The interventions that have been put in place are on an individual needs led basis which directly matches their needs. Although this money is ring fenced, we are committed to providing bespoke provision for all children to ensure all have the opportunity of making the best possible progress. We have also continued developing relationships and communication with parents regarding the barriers to learning for their child and are working together for the benefit of the child. We have also continued with the discretionary spend for areas to support the families in reducing barriers to learning, as can be seen in our Pupil Premium Strategy Statement.

 

 

 

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